Who are you online?

Personal branding is not the future it is the now.  Make sure that your Social Media platforms portray you exactly the way you would want some one to see you.  Are you sure you want your boss to see you the same way your family does?  Privacy is dead.  But remember you are the one in control.  You are in charge of your profiles so make sure they say what you want them to.

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/job-seekers-getting-asked-facebook-080920368.html

Job seekers getting asked for Facebook passwords

Resume, references, password: Job seekers get asked in interviews to provide Facebook logins

Associated PressBy Manuel Valdes, Associated Press | Associated Press – Tue, Mar 20, 2012 7:55 AM EDT

  •                Robert Collins of Baltimore poses for a photo Friday, March 16, 2012 at Cylburn Arboretum in Baltimore. When Collins returned from a leave of absence from his job as a security guard with the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services in 2010, he was asked for his Facebook login and password during a reinstatement interview, purportedly so the agency could check for any gang affiliations. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)View PhotoRobert Collins of Baltimore poses for a photo Friday, March 16, 2012 at Cylburn Arboretum in Baltimore. When Collins returned from a leave of absence from his job as a security guard with the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services in 2010, he was asked for his Facebook login and password during a reinstatement interview, purportedly so the agency could check for any gang affiliations. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)

 

SEATTLE (AP) — When Justin Bassett interviewed for a new job, he expected the usual questions about experience and references. So he was astonished when the interviewer asked for something else: his Facebook username and password.

Bassett, a New York City statistician, had just finished answering a few character questions when the interviewer turned to her computer to search for his Facebook page. But she couldn’t see his private profile. She turned back and asked him to hand over his login information.

Bassett refused and withdrew his application, saying he didn’t want to work for a company that would seek such personal information. But as the job market steadily improves, other job candidates are confronting the same question from prospective employers, and some of them cannot afford to say no.

In their efforts to vet applicants, some companies and government agencies are going beyond merely glancing at a person’s social networking profiles and instead asking to log in as the user to have a look around.

“It’s akin to requiring someone’s house keys,” said Orin Kerr, a George Washington University law professor and former federal prosecutor who calls it “an egregious privacy violation.”

Questions have been raised about the legality of the practice, which is also the focus of proposed legislation in Illinois and Maryland that would forbid public agencies from asking for access to social networks.

Since the rise of social networking, it has become common for managers to review publically available Facebook profiles, Twitter accounts and other sites to learn more about job candidates. But many users, especially on Facebook, have their profiles set to private, making them available only to selected people or certain networks.

Companies that don’t ask for passwords have taken other steps — such as asking applicants to friend human resource managers or to log in to a company computer during an interview. Once employed, some workers have been required to sign non-disparagement agreements that ban them from talking negatively about an employer on social media.

Asking for a candidate’s password is more prevalent among public agencies, especially those seeking to fill law enforcement positions such as police officers or 911 dispatchers.

Back in 2010, Robert Collins was returning to his job as a security guard at the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services after taking a leave following his mother’s death. During a reinstatement interview, he was asked for his login and password, purportedly so the agency could check for any gang affiliations. He was stunned by the request but complied.

“I needed my job to feed my family. I had to,” he recalled,

After the ACLU complained about the practice, the agency amended its policy, asking instead for job applicants to log in during interviews.

“To me, that’s still invasive. I can appreciate the desire to learn more about the applicant, but it’s still a violation of people’s personal privacy,” said Collins, whose case inspired Maryland’s legislation.

Until last year, the city of Bozeman, Mont., had a long-standing policy of asking job applicants for passwords to their email addresses, social-networking websites and other online accounts.

And since 2006, the McLean County, Ill., sheriff’s office has been one of several Illinois sheriff’s departments that ask applicants to sign into social media sites to be screened.

Chief Deputy Rusty Thomas defended the practice, saying applicants have a right to refuse. But no one has ever done so. Thomas said that “speaks well of the people we have apply.”

When asked what sort of material would jeopardize job prospects, Thomas said “it depends on the situation” but could include “inappropriate pictures or relationships with people who are underage, illegal behavior.”

In Spotsylvania County, Va., the sheriff’s department asks applicants to friend background investigators for jobs at the 911 dispatch center and for law enforcement positions.

“In the past, we’ve talked to friends and neighbors, but a lot of times we found that applicants interact more through social media sites than they do with real friends,” said Capt. Mike Harvey. “Their virtual friends will know more about them than a person living 30 yards away from them.”

Harvey said investigators look for any “derogatory” behavior that could damage the agency’s reputation.

E. Chandlee Bryan, a career coach and co-author of the book “The Twitter Job Search Guide,” said job seekers should always be aware of what’s on their social media sites and assume someone is going to look at it.

Bryan said she is troubled by companies asking for logins, but she feels it’s not a violation if an employer asks to see a Facebook profile through a friend request. And she’s not troubled by non-disparagement agreements.

“I think that when you work for a company, they are essentially supporting you in exchange for your work. I think if you’re dissatisfied, you should go to them and not on a social media site,” she said.

More companies are also using third-party applications to scour Facebook profiles, Bryan said. One app called BeKnown can sometimes access personal profiles, short of wall messages, if a job seeker allows it.

Sears is one of the companies using apps. An applicant has the option of logging into the Sears job site through Facebook by allowing a third-party application to draw information from the profile, such as friend lists.

Sears Holdings Inc. spokeswoman Kim Freely said using a Facebook profile to apply allows Sears to be updated on the applicant’s work history.

The company assumes “that people keep their social profiles updated to the minute, which allows us to consider them for other jobs in the future or for ones that they may not realize are available currently,” she said.

Giving out Facebook login information violates the social network’s terms of service. But those terms have no real legal weight, and experts say the legality of asking for such information remains murky.

The Department of Justice regards it as a federal crime to enter a social networking site in violation of the terms of service, but during recent congressional testimony, the agency said such violations would not be prosecuted.

But Lori Andrews, law professor at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law specializing in Internet privacy, is concerned about the pressure placed on applicants, even if they voluntarily provide access to social sites.

“Volunteering is coercion if you need a job,” Andrews said.

Neither Facebook nor Twitter responded to repeated requests for comment.

In New York, Bassett considered himself lucky that he was able to turn down the consulting gig at a lobbying firm.

“I think asking for account login credentials is regressive,” he said. “If you need to put food on the table for your three kids, you can’t afford to stand up for your belief.”

___

McFarland reported from Springfield, Ill.

___

Manuel Valdes can be reached at https://twitter.com/ByManuelValdes .

Shannon McFarland can be reached at https://twitter.com/shanmcf .

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Email is king

New survey focusing on B2B suggests that social media is becoming the best way to keep in contact with customers. Not surprisingly Email gets the best response.  I tell all my clients that Email is king.  You can connect with people thru their various social media outlets but everyone has different platforms (some tweet others Facebook) and times of day or amount of times that they actually do go on but pretty much everyone checks their emails at least once – most multiple – times a day.  All good social media plans should include getting email addresses in the email.  Beg borrow or steal (well don’t steal them..) to get your clients to give you permission to email them.

 

http://www.emarketer.com/Article.aspx?R=1008920&ecid=a6506033675d47f881651943c21c5ed4

B2B Marketers Optimistic About Social Media for Lead Generation

MARCH 22, 2012

Email currently most effective lead generation tactic

It’s no surprise that business-to-business marketers and agencies are looking for leads online. A February 2012 survey of B2B marketing and agency professionals by BtoB Magazine found that 59% view lead generation as their greatest online marketing challenge. To meet that goal, marketers are exploring new channels in 2012, particularly social media—and for many, the approach is working.

Currently, most respondents rely primarily on email—57% said it was the online channel that contributed the most qualified leads to their businesses. But a significant number said that some other online channel was their biggest driver of leads, though this group was split among several channels, including paid search (20%) and social media (13%). Respondents from agencies were more likely than marketers to report that social or search was their most successful marketing channel, possibly because agencies are often more able to specialize in such tactics.

 

Online Marketing Tactic that Is the Greatest Contributor to Leads According to US B2B Agencies and Marketers, Feb 2012 (% of total)

 

Both B2B marketers and agencies felt that social media in particular has room to grow for their organizations. After email, social media was found to be the most widely adopted marketing channel, but only 5% of respondents described their social media efforts as “well-optimized,” compared with 30% who felt that way about their email programs. A majority, 55%, said that their social efforts were early-stage but showed promise.

 

Incremental Value that Social Media Marketing Will Drive in 2012 According to US B2B Agencies and Marketers, Feb 2012 (% of total)

 

Data suggests that, in the social space, B2B enterprises should look first to LinkedIn and blogs. An October 2011 study of B2B marketers worldwide conducted by marketing automation software provider Pardot found that LinkedIn was the social media tool most successful at lead generation, followed closely by blogging.

 

Social Media Tool that Is Most Successful for Lead Generation According to B2B Marketers Worldwide, Oct 2011 (% of respondents)

 

Paid search presents another opportunity for B2B marketers to grow their lead generation efforts. Although 18% of marketers reported that it was their single greatest lead creator, only 11% said they had a mature and well-optimized search program in place. Forty-three percent said they didn’t use search marketing at all.

Corporate subscribers have access to all eMarketer analyst reports, articles, data and more. Join the over 750 companies already benefiting from eMarketer’s approach. Learn more.

Check out today’s other articles, “Fashion Adds Fuel to Fast-Growing Retail Ecommerce Sales and Mobile Video Viewership Gaining in Australia.”

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3 Tricks to look good on webcam chats

Recently I have been asked more and more by clients and remote employers if I can Skype, GoToMeeting etc.  I like the phone because I can not be so ‘on’ – which is probably why the client likes it that much more.  Any how – here is a quick how to look good (or at least – better) on webcam meetings.

http://www.fastcompany.com/1819425/web-cam-glam-3-easy-ways-to-look-polished-on-video-chats

Webcam Glam: 3 Easy Tricks To Look Polished On Video Chats

BY Amber Mac | 02-24-2012 | 7:22 AM

More than 300 billion total calling minutes take place annually on Skype; 50% of those calls are video conversations. Microsoft executive Steve Ballmer revealed this stat at CES last month while discussing the Internet software’s ongoing success internationally.

While the technology continues to improve, users are slow to learn how to make video calls look good. While not all of us have Oprah’s Skype Guest Kit, which reportedly includes a state-of-the art laptop, desk-sized tripod, and prepaid return shipping label, there are some simple things the average business person can do to take online video chats to the next level.

Buying a USB-powered microphone is an obvious first step (along with using an Ethernet connection versus Wi-Fi) to increase your computer conversation quality, but it’s time to think beyond that. With many employers relying on video chat software to keep employees connected, individuals using webcams to produce expert how-to videos, and television broadcasters depending on this technology to beam guests in from all over the world, it’s no longer just good enough to be happy that your connection works.

Here are three simple tips (along with some convincing before and afters to seal the deal) to improve your webcam video picture.

1.  Look up, not down.  I can’t tell you how many people we interview for Fast Company‘s Work Flow series who are staring directly down at their web camera, nose hairs and all. In other words, no matter how technical they are, most webcam users forget that your eye line matters. If you’re looking down at your camera, the person you’re calling is looking up at you. In other words, it’s not an attractive view. Set your computer (if you’re on a laptop) on a few books so that you’re looking slightly up at the web camera. Not only will this tip make your image look better–and slim down that double chin if you have one–it will be easier to focus on the conversation instead of the empty space in front of you.

2.  Light in front, not in back.  If you’re in a room with a window (i.e. natural light), face towards the window. This will ensure that light falls on your face. Never sit with your back to a window while doing an online video conversation or meeting unless you also have light on the front of your face to balance things out (a backlit shot is not a good shot). If you’re in a room without a window, dig around for a light that you can place in front of you–even if you only have access to a small lamp.

3.  Go external, not internal.  Built-in web cameras have come a long way, but external web cameras have come even further. Just a few years ago the iSight, Apple’s built-in cam, was excellent quality. However, many external web cameras have far surpassed this technology. For less than $50 you can buy an HD web camera that will dramatically sharpen your video. For example, I travel with a Logitech HD webcam C270 series for a better image. Ladies, keep in mind that while HD does provider a sharper picture, this also means that you might also want to do a makeup touch-up before your on-camera appearance since high definition shows a lot of detail.

Get more tips on working effectively in Amber Mac’s Work Flow series.

 

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Cloudy Days are a comin’

Walmart is getting into the Cloud Biz in a smart way.  For a small fee they will put your DVDs into their cloud service.  From today’s Cynopsis digital:

 

Walmart has announced a new in-store “Disc-to-Digital” program that will allow customers to bring a DVD to a Walmart store in order to create a digital copy of that disc. The digital copy would then be loaded on to their account on VUDU, an online video service owned by Walmart. If customers don’t have a free VUDU account, a store rep will help them create one. The price for each conversion will be $2 ($5 if customers want to convert a standard definition disc into an HD digital copy). The program will start on April 16 in over 3,500 Walmart locations. As part of the new offering, Walmart has partnered with Twentieth Century Fox, Universal, Sony Pictures, Paramount and Warner Bros., making each studio’s library of movies available for conversion. Disc-to-Digital will also support the UltraViolet digital locker initiative backed by Hollywood, meaning customers will be able to purchase and watch UltraViolet-enabled titles through VUDU, which Walmart says is currently available on more than 300 internet-connected devices.

 

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Does big biz know us better than ourselves?

How Target Figured Out A Teen Girl Was Pregnant Before Her Father Did

English: Logo of Target, US-based retail chainTarget has got you in its aim

Every time you go shopping, you share intimate details about your consumption patterns with retailers. And many of those retailers are studying those details to figure out what you like, what you need, and which coupons are most likely to make you happy. Target, for example, has figured out how to data-mine its way into your womb, to figure out whether you have a baby on the way long before you need to start buying diapers.

Charles Duhigg outlines in the New York Times how Target tries to hook parents-to-be at that crucial moment before they turn into rampant — and loyal — buyers of all things pastel, plastic, and miniature. He talked to Target statistician Andrew Pole — before Target freaked out and cut off all communications — about the clues to a customer’s impending bundle of joy. Target assigns every customer a Guest ID number, tied to their credit card, name, or email address that becomes a bucket that stores a history of everything they’ve bought and any demographic information Target has collected from them or bought from other sources. Using that, Pole looked at historical buying data for all the ladies who had signed up for Target baby registries in the past. From the NYT:

[Pole] ran test after test, analyzing the data, and before long some useful patterns emerged. Lotions, for example. Lots of people buy lotion, but one of Pole’s colleagues noticed that women on the baby registry were buying larger quantities of unscented lotion around the beginning of their second trimester. Another analyst noted that sometime in the first 20 weeks, pregnant women loaded up on supplements like calcium, magnesium and zinc. Many shoppers purchase soap and cotton balls, but when someone suddenly starts buying lots of scent-free soap and extra-big bags of cotton balls, in addition to hand sanitizers and washcloths, it signals they could be getting close to their delivery date.

Or have a rather nasty infection…

As Pole’s computers crawled through the data, he was able to identify about 25 products that, when analyzed together, allowed him to assign each shopper a “pregnancy prediction” score. More important, he could also estimate her due date to within a small window, so Target could send coupons timed to very specific stages of her pregnancy.

One Target employee I spoke to provided a hypothetical example. Take a fictional Target shopper named Jenny Ward, who is 23, lives in Atlanta and in March bought cocoa-butter lotion, a purse large enough to double as a diaper bag, zinc and magnesium supplements and a bright blue rug. There’s, say, an 87 percent chance that she’s pregnant and that her delivery date is sometime in late August.

via How Companies Learn Your Secrets – NYTimes.com.

And perhaps that it’s a boy based on the color of that rug?

So Target started sending coupons for baby items to customers according to their pregnancy scores. Duhigg shares an anecdote — so good that it sounds made up — that conveys how eerily accurate the targeting is. An angry man went into a Target outside of Minneapolis, demanding to talk to a manager:

 

English: Photograph of abdomen of a pregnant womanTarget knows before it shows.

“My daughter got this in the mail!” he said. “She’s still in high school, and you’re sending her coupons for baby clothes and cribs? Are you trying to encourage her to get pregnant?”

The manager didn’t have any idea what the man was talking about. He looked at the mailer. Sure enough, it was addressed to the man’s daughter and contained advertisements for maternity clothing, nursery furniture and pictures of smiling infants. The manager apologized and then called a few days later to apologize again.

(Nice customer service, Target.)

On the phone, though, the father was somewhat abashed. “I had a talk with my daughter,” he said. “It turns out there’s been some activities in my house I haven’t been completely aware of. She’s due in August. I owe you an apology.”

What Target discovered fairly quickly is that it creeped people out that the company knew about their pregnancies in advance.

“If we send someone a catalog and say, ‘Congratulations on your first child!’ and they’ve never told us they’re pregnant, that’s going to make some people uncomfortable,” Pole told me. “We are very conservative about compliance with all privacy laws. But even if you’re following the law, you can do things where people get queasy.

Bold is mine. That’s a quote for our times.

So Target got sneakier about sending the coupons. The company can create personalized booklets; instead of sending people with high pregnancy scores books o’ coupons solely for diapers, rattles, strollers, and the “Go the F*** to Sleep” book, they more subtly spread them about:

“Then we started mixing in all these ads for things we knew pregnant women would never buy, so the baby ads looked random. We’d put an ad for a lawn mower next to diapers. We’d put a coupon for wineglasses next to infant clothes. That way, it looked like all the products were chosen by chance.

“And we found out that as long as a pregnant woman thinks she hasn’t been spied on, she’ll use the coupons. She just assumes that everyone else on her block got the same mailer for diapers and cribs. As long as we don’t spook her, it works.”

via How Companies Learn Your Secrets – NYTimes.com.

So the Target philosophy towards expecting parents is similar to the first date philosophy? Even if you’ve fully stalked the person on Facebook and Google beforehand, pretend like you know less than you do so as not to creep the person out.

Duhigg suggests that Target’s gangbusters revenue growth — $44 billion in 2002, when Pole was hired, to $67 billion in 2010 — is attributable to Pole’s helping the retail giant corner the baby-on-board market, citing company president Gregg Steinhafel boasting to investors about the company’s “heightened focus on items and categories that appeal to specific guest segments such as mom and baby.”

Target was none too happy about Duhigg’s plans to write this story. They refused to let him go to Target headquarters. When he flew out anyway, he discovered he was on a list of prohibited visitors.

I think most readers of the excellent piece will find it both unsettling and unsurprising. With all the talk these days about the data grab most companies are engaged in, Target’s collection and analysis seem as expected as its customers’ babies. But with their analysis moving into areas as sensitive as pregnancy, and so accurately, who knows how else they might start profiling Target shoppers? The store’s bulls-eye logo may now send a little shiver of fear down the closely-watched spines of some, though I can promise you that Target is not the only store doing this. Those people chilled by stores’ tracking and profiling them may want to consider going the way of the common criminal — and paying for far more of their purchases in cash.

A must read: How Companies Learn Your Secrets [New York Times] drawn from Charles Duhigg’s forthcoming book, The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business

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Updated Client List

Check out our updated Client list.  Lots of exciting stuff happening at Gigante this year!

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Pinterest 101

 

Pinterest Becomes Top Traffic Driver for Retailers [INFOGRAPHIC]

Pinterest, a two-year-old social bookmarking site that lets users collect and share things they like on the web, is driving increasingly significant amounts of traffic to retailers’ websites.

The service enables users to create online bulletin boards, or “pinboards,” for popular categories such as home decor, food and wedding inspiration. Members can use Pinterest’s “Pin It” bookmarklet tool and iPhone app to save things they see online and offline, and explore and repin the images their friends collect via their personal newsfeeds. The website is especially popular among women, who account for 58% of Pinterest’s traffic, according to Experian Hitwise.

 

SEE ALSO: 21 Must-Follow Pinterest Users
 

The site’s popularity is quickly growing. Pinterest’s traffic increased more than fourfold between September 2011 and December 2011, bringing in 7.51 million unique visitors in December alone, data from Compete indicates. The amount of traffic Pinterest sent elsewhere has risen accordingly, becoming a top five referrer for several apparel retailers, according to internal data from Monetate, which provided the infographic below.

Although Pinterest is becoming a significant source of traffic for retailers, search still dominates, and the site has yet to prove itself as a potential sales channel. At present, scant data is available about the social network’s conversion rates.

[via Monetate]

 

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Look at me. Now Look at your boyfriend.

 I imagine we are going to see a glut of new Old Spice videos.

P&G To Lay Off 1,600 After Discovering It’s Free To Advertise On Facebook

Jim Edwards | Jan. 30, 2012, 3:44 PM | 265,472 | 12
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P&G said it would lay off 1,600 staffers, including marketers, as part of a cost-cutting exercise. More interestingly, CEO Robert McDonald finally seems to have woken up to the fact that he cannot keep increasing P&G’s ad budget forever, regardless of what happens to its sales.

He told Wall Street analysts that he would have to “moderate” his ad budget because Facebook and Googlecan be “more efficient” than the traditional media that usually eats the lion’s share of P&G’s ad budget. 

This is coming from the man who increased P&G’s adspend by a staggering 24 percent over the two years through October 2011, even though sales rose only 6 percent in the same period.

Note that P&G’s revenues were up 4 percent to $22 billion in the quarter but the company’s costs for sales, general and administrative work were flat.

P&G’s staggering ad budget has become a bit of an issue among analysts. On the call, McDonald and his crew were asked about ad costs three different times. McDonald eventually said:

As we’ve said historically, the 9% to 11% range [for advertising as a percentage of sales] has been what we have spent. Actually, I believe that over time, we will see the increase in the cost of advertising moderate. There are just so many different media available today and we’re quickly moving more and more of our businesses into digital. And in that space, there are lots of different avenues available.

In the digital space, with things like Facebook and Google and others, we find that the return on investment of the advertising, when properly designed, when the big idea is there, can be much more efficient. One example is our Old Spice campaign, where we had 1.8 billion free impressions and there are many other examples I can cite from all over the world. So while there may be pressure on advertising, particularly in the United States, for example, during the year of a presidential election, there are mitigating factors like the plethora of media available.

P&G’s Old Spice campaign is a textbook example of what the entire company should be doing. The problem is that the entire company isn’t doing it. Check out Mr. Clean’s Twitter stream, for instance. Oh, right—he doesn’t have one.

McDonald’s recent discovery that digital media is free comes after the long-delayed launch of Tide Pods, now scheduled for a month from now but with only a limited supply. It was originally planned for July 2011. The ad budget for that campaign is estimated at $150 million and will come from agency Saatchi & Saatchi.

The problem is that while P&G has struggled to get a single U.S. pod out the factory door, several of its competitors have already launched competing laundry pod products.

Please follow Advertising on Twitter and Facebook.
Follow Jim Edwards on Twitter.

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Mobile purchasing power is here

From Cynopsis Digital

 

Pew Research Center finds that 52% of U.S. adult cell phone owners used their phones for help in making purchasing decisions while they were inside a store during the 2011 holiday season. In addition, during a 30-day period before and after Christmas 2011, 38% of cell phone owners called someone while they were in a store for advice about a purchase they were considering making. 24% of cell owners used their device to look up product reviews online while they were in-store. And 25% of adult cell phone owners used their phones to price-check a product while they were in the store. When Pew Research asked survey participants what happened on the most recent instance of them using their phones to look up the price of a product they found in a store, the responses were:

 

37% decided to not buy the product at all.

35% purchased the product at that store.

19% bought it online.

8% purchased it at another store.

 

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Facebook Timeline is coming for you

Weather you like it or not.  Everyone is going to be able to see your posts from today back so if you have anything you do not want people to see start editing!

http://techcrunch.com/2012/01/24/facebook-timeline-now-open-to-all-users-get-a-week-to-clean-up-profiles/

 

You can run, but you can’t hide. Facebook’s biggest user interface overhaul since the Wall, the Facebook Timeline, is now becoming mandatory for all users. According to the company, over the next few weeks, everyone will get the new Timeline. And here’s the important part: when you do, you’ll have just seven days to preview what’s there now, and hide anything you don’t want others to see.

In case you’re unfamiliar, the Facebook Timeline makes it far easier for you to travel back through your Facebook posts – posts which normally disappeared off your Wall and into oblivion. The posts from these previous months and years are now accessible through new navigational elements on the right-side of your screen that let you quickly travel back in time to the day you were born.

You can fill in data from your pre-Facebook years using the new status update box, which now includes support for adding a specific year and various “life events.”  These events include things like marriages, births, deaths, new jobs, trips and vacations, new homes, and other things you might want to record in the scrapbook-like Timeline.

With Timeline’s added ability to find older posts, including those from the days before your boss, grandparents, mom and dad were on Facebook, users will need to do a rapid cleanup on their profiles when the Timeline goes live.

Facebook explains how to hide posts you don’t want to appear on your Timeline (click the pencil to hide, delete or edit a post). You can also use the privacy drop-down to change who can see posts (e.g. “Only Me”).

In addition, the company is releasing a new tool today called Activity Log, which is where you can review all your posts and activity, from today back to when you first started using Facebook. Fortunately, only you can see your activity log.

Previously, users had to go out and get Timeline for themselves. Facebook was specifically trying to not push it too hard. It wouldn’t show News Feed stories announcing your friends had migrated, for example, as the company wanted the Timeline to be an opt-in decision that allowed people enough time to moderate their profile posts. Giving users seven days to do the same is somewhat an extension of that thinking, although could prove troublesome for irregular Facebook users who don’t realize they’ve been migrated, leaving themselves exposed when the week is up.

If you want to be proactive and get the Timeline now, go to the Introducing Timeline page and click “Get Timeline.” Or you can wait until you see an announcement at the top of your profile.

Timeline will also be available on Android, m.facebook.com and iOS.

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